Watch: Live at The Thirsty Soul 10-10-2019

I briefly toyed with click-bait ideas when titling this post, for this video received a copyright claim related to my version of John Prine’s Please Don’t Bury Me. However, it’s just the sort of non-troversy that I’ve grown bored of in other facets of my life, so why contribute to the demise of civilization in such a fashion? My punishment is that–if I were to join YouTube’s partner program–I could not monetize this video. My interpretation is: I rocked the piano so hard I broke the algorithm.

Do not allow this contemporary tale of woe overshadow the first tune I play in this set, though. Overstayer Question is a brand new tune that is short and easy to remember and perfect to play if someone sticks around too long at a party.

Watch: Live at The Thirsty Soul Philly (and Piano-Practiced)

Completely energized and three days into quitting smoking, I ravaged the piano with unrelenting force. Featuring a couple of instrumentals, including Heart & Soul, and concluded with the Boogie Woogie.

Having a piano sitting around the house is awesome. I can’t keep my hands from pecking it, prodding it, tinkling its keys. The ability to practice without having to turn a bunch of studio equipment on has re-ignited the piano fire in my belly. I hope you enjoy my rendition of Heart and Soul; this is the first time I’ve ever performed it in public, and I think it deserves to become a regular piece in my sets.

Watch: Live at The Thirsty Soul Philly 9-5-2019

The thing about open mic is that it is a good training ground for learning to fail gracefully. Here I pay tribute to Jay Russell, a dearly departed bandmate from yesteryear, by unsuccessfully muddling through The Pledge. However, my inability to complete the song did not surprise me: I had only learned it the day before, and practiced it a handful of times. I learned firsthand that the concept of “turning failure into success” is real. Interestingly, the fellow directly in front of me immediately embraced the chorus, “I pledge allegiance to cigarettes and booze,” as though it were a song he has stumbled down the sidewalk blurting at 2:17 am several times, despite having only heard it this very night.

Also, in a performance situation, having an old standby like Chinese Buffet to cap off the performance in a positive way is an excellent arrow to have in my quiver of performance strategy. Also featured: Spam.

Break It Up, an excellent unheard album by Merchants of Soul

In 2004, I holed up in the basement of a window factory in New Jersey with my friend Jay Russell. Two years later, we had recorded Break It Up (playable below). We never released it, but his untimely death at 48 years old has sparked interest in it among his friends and family. I spent the last 3 weeks re-mixing the songs and set up a Bandcamp account with which to publish it.

I feel honored to have worked with Jay; he put an abundance of trust in me when I had way more ambition than understanding of how the heck to produce and engineer a proper album. He was extremely talented, funny, and a great pleasure to work with; these songs represent Replacements-style classic rock, with blues, punk, and R&B influences and an enormous guitar presence throughout.

Please have a listen and, if you are so compelled, share it and send a few bucks to his family.

Production and Engineering Notes

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Watch: Live at The Thirsty Soul Philly

Great night, lightly attended by excellent people. We did a second round, so here I am performing 6 songs. For the second set, I indulged myself by singing a vulgar song that–as my pal and would-be manager, Geoff, observed–has the structure of a children’s song. Hopefully children will not sing it.*

 

* Incidentally, the aforementioned vulgar tune was inspired by a recent visit to Gettysburg, which is documented at: